Researchers in the Department of Anthropology at Colorado State University found that players commonly seek stress relief online, which, though sounding like a good thing, can actually lead to both therapeutic and problematic gaming situations.

This research on stress relief and online gaming (which can be found here and here) suggests that those who have less stress in their offline lives are able to play the game therapeutically, that is, in ways that improve their lives and well-being. They report feeling better in both their online and offline lives because of games like World of Warcraft (WoW). However, playing for stress relief can also lead to so-called “addictive” or “problematic” play situations, where individuals game compulsively and lose control of their online existence to the detriment of their offline lives.

…Read More…

anthrostories

jtotheizzoe:

Are Male and Female Brains Different?

This awesome new video from BrainCraft takes a look at the old adage “Men are from Mars, women are from Venus” through the lens of modern brain science. Sure, there’s lots of biological differences between people who identify as male, female, or neither… but in terms of our brains, do any of them really matter? Or are we just trying to mold science into what society already believes is true?

Watch and learn.

(Source)

On a scale of 1 to 100, Jefferson gives the city as a whole a “75 or a good 80,” but researchers are using their own sophisticated formulas to track New Orleans’ recovery. “Katrina will be the event that pushes us to a better level of understanding,” says anthropologist Kate Browne from Colorado State University, who spent the last nine years following a large storm-scattered family as they returned to the New Orleans area.
It’s because of New Orleans, for instance, that researchers who specialize in disaster now agree that disaster recovery is not linear, but includes “major lurches and setbacks,” says Browne. The aftermath of the 2005 storm also reinforced existing disaster research showing that catastrophes exacerbate existing inequities. “Disaster does not level the ground,” she says.

Our Dr. Browne, one of the foremost disaster recovery researchers, is in the news again! Read her thoughts on how New Orleans as recovered from Hurricane Katrina, nine years later.

(Source)

On a scale of 1 to 100, Jefferson gives the city as a whole a “75 or a good 80,” but researchers are using their own sophisticated formulas to track New Orleans’ recovery. “Katrina will be the event that pushes us to a better level of understanding,” says anthropologist Kate Browne from Colorado State University, who spent the last nine years following a large storm-scattered family as they returned to the New Orleans area.

It’s because of New Orleans, for instance, that researchers who specialize in disaster now agree that disaster recovery is not linear, but includes “major lurches and setbacks,” says Browne. The aftermath of the 2005 storm also reinforced existing disaster research showing that catastrophes exacerbate existing inequities. “Disaster does not level the ground,” she says.

Our Dr. Browne, one of the foremost disaster recovery researchers, is in the news again! Read her thoughts on how New Orleans as recovered from Hurricane Katrina, nine years later.

archaeologicalnews

Origins of Mysterious World Trade Center Ship Revealed

archaeologicalnews:

image

In July 2010, amid the gargantuan rebuilding effort at the site of the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan, construction workers halted the backhoes when they uncovered something unexpected just south of where the Twin Towers once stood.

At 22 feet (6.7 meters) below today’s street level, in a pit that would become an underground security and parking complex, excavators found the mangled skeleton of a long-forgotten wooden ship.

Now, a new report finds that tree rings in those waterlogged ribs show the vessel was likely built in 1773, or soon after, in a small shipyard near Philadelphia. What’s more, the ship was perhaps made from the same kind of white oak trees used to build parts of Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and U.S. Constitution were signed, according to the study published this month in the journal Tree-Ring Research. Read more.

Here’s just a taste of what you can look forward to with our Archaeology Field School photos! 
This is the crew at Niwot Ridge,where they recorded historic and prehistoric sites. The oldest site dated back to the late Paleoindian period, over 9,000 years ago!
Find out more about the field school here: http://anthropology.colostate.edu/archaeology-field-school/
Interested? Our Field School Information Session will be September 23rd, 2014 (5:00PM) in Clark C249. Mark your calendars!
[Pictured: Noah Benedict, Dominique Kovalaski, Christina Burch, Lance Shockley, Cassidy Crawford, Hallie Meeker, Brady Nelson, and Michelle Dinkel]

Here’s just a taste of what you can look forward to with our Archaeology Field School photos! 

This is the crew at Niwot Ridge,where they recorded historic and prehistoric sites. The oldest site dated back to the late Paleoindian period, over 9,000 years ago!

Find out more about the field school here: http://anthropology.colostate.edu/archaeology-field-school/

Interested? Our Field School Information Session will be September 23rd, 2014 (5:00PM) in Clark C249. Mark your calendars!

[Pictured: Noah Benedict, Dominique Kovalaski, Christina Burch, Lance Shockley, Cassidy Crawford, Hallie Meeker, Brady Nelson, and Michelle Dinkel]

wildcat2030
wildcat2030:

Taller, Fatter, Older: How Humans Have Changed in 100 Years - Humans are getting taller; they’re also fatter than ever and live longer than at any time in history. And all of these changes have occurred in the past 100 years, scientists say. So is evolution via natural selection at play here? Not in the sense of actual genetic changes, as one century is not enough time for such changes to occur, according to researchers. Most of the transformations that occur within such a short time period “are simply the developmental responses of organisms to changed conditions,” such as differences in nutrition, food distribution, health care and hygiene practices, said Stephen Stearns, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at Yale University. [10 Things That Make Humans Special] But the origin of these changes may be much deeper and more complex than that, said Stearns, pointing to a study finding that British soldiers have shot up in height in the past century. “Evolution has shaped the developmental program that can respond flexibly to changes in the environment,” Stearns said. “So when you look at that change the British army recruits went through over about a 100-year period, that was shaped by the evolutionary past.” And though it may seem that natural selection does not affect humans the way it did thousands of years ago, such evolutionary mechanisms still play a role in shaping humans as a species, Stearns said. “A big take-home point of all current studies of human evolution is that culture, particularly in the form of medicine, but also in the form of urbanization and technological support, clean air and clean water, is changing selection pressures on humans,” Stearns told Live Science. “When you look at what happens when the Taliban denies the polio vaccination in Pakistan, that is actually exerting a selection pressure that is different in Pakistan than we have in New York City,” he said. Here’s a look at some of the major changes to humans that have occurred in the past century or so. (via Taller, Fatter, Older: How Humans Have Changed in 100 Years)

wildcat2030:

Taller, Fatter, Older: How Humans Have Changed in 100 Years
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Humans are getting taller; they’re also fatter than ever and live longer than at any time in history. And all of these changes have occurred in the past 100 years, scientists say. So is evolution via natural selection at play here? Not in the sense of actual genetic changes, as one century is not enough time for such changes to occur, according to researchers. Most of the transformations that occur within such a short time period “are simply the developmental responses of organisms to changed conditions,” such as differences in nutrition, food distribution, health care and hygiene practices, said Stephen Stearns, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at Yale University. [10 Things That Make Humans Special] But the origin of these changes may be much deeper and more complex than that, said Stearns, pointing to a study finding that British soldiers have shot up in height in the past century. “Evolution has shaped the developmental program that can respond flexibly to changes in the environment,” Stearns said. “So when you look at that change the British army recruits went through over about a 100-year period, that was shaped by the evolutionary past.” And though it may seem that natural selection does not affect humans the way it did thousands of years ago, such evolutionary mechanisms still play a role in shaping humans as a species, Stearns said. “A big take-home point of all current studies of human evolution is that culture, particularly in the form of medicine, but also in the form of urbanization and technological support, clean air and clean water, is changing selection pressures on humans,” Stearns told Live Science. “When you look at what happens when the Taliban denies the polio vaccination in Pakistan, that is actually exerting a selection pressure that is different in Pakistan than we have in New York City,” he said. Here’s a look at some of the major changes to humans that have occurred in the past century or so. (via Taller, Fatter, Older: How Humans Have Changed in 100 Years)