dead-men-talking
cultofweird:

In 1845, the Royal Navy ships HMS Erebus and HMS Terror embarked on an expedition to explore the Canadian arctic. Both ships and all 129 crew members vanished. Search parties and scientific expeditions throughout the last 169 years have turned up evidence of lead-poisoning-fueled madness and cannibalism, including disarticulated skeletal remains unearthed in 1981 with cut marks in the bone. The preserved bodies of crewmen John Torrington, John Hartnell and William Braine were exhumed from the permafrost on Beechey Island in 1984 to determine cause of death. It is believed that lung problems, aggravated by lead poisoning from the cans of food aboard the ships, lead to deadly pneumonia.Both ships and the majority of their crew have never been found. Their fates remain a mystery.
Daily weird news and oddities at Cult of Weird

cultofweird:

In 1845, the Royal Navy ships HMS Erebus and HMS Terror embarked on an expedition to explore the Canadian arctic. Both ships and all 129 crew members vanished. Search parties and scientific expeditions throughout the last 169 years have turned up evidence of lead-poisoning-fueled madness and cannibalism, including disarticulated skeletal remains unearthed in 1981 with cut marks in the bone. The preserved bodies of crewmen John Torrington, John Hartnell and William Braine were exhumed from the permafrost on Beechey Island in 1984 to determine cause of death. It is believed that lung problems, aggravated by lead poisoning from the cans of food aboard the ships, lead to deadly pneumonia.

Both ships and the majority of their crew have never been found. Their fates remain a mystery.

Daily weird news and oddities at Cult of Weird

anthrogirlet
cosmosscience:

Amazing artwork from whisperfall.
What happens when we sleep?
Imagine you get a healthy 8-9 hours of sleep without waking up constantly in the night (hah, I wish). What would happen in these 8-9 hours?
When we sleep we go through a reoccuring cycle that repeats itself approx every 90-110 minutes. During this cycle we experience NREM (non-rapid eye movement) and REM (rapid eye movement)  sleep. NREM is split into four stages and occurs 75% of the night, whilst REM only occurs 25% of the night.
NREM:
NREM occurs when we begin to fall asleep. We enter stage 1 when we are between falling asleep and being awake. Stage 1 is considered “light sleep”. Our muscle activity slows down and twitching is normal. It is very easy to wake someone who is in stage 1 of NREM. 
We enter stage 2 of NREM after around 10 minutes of light sleep (stage 1). Stage 2 lasts around 20 minutes and accounts for the largest part of human sleep. Breathing and heart rate start to slow down, body temperature drops and we become disengaged from surroundings. 
After 20 minutes of stage 2, we enter stage 3. The brain begins to produce delta waves, which is a type of wave that has a high amplitude and low frequency. Breathing and heart rate are at their lowest levels during this stage.
Stage 3 and 4 are known as deep sleep. If we are awakened during deep sleep we will often feel disorientated and some of us grumpy/annoyed. It is normal for children to experience bed-wetting, night terrors or sleepwalking during stage 4. A lot happens during stage 3 and 4; muscles are relaxed, blood pressure drops, breathing becomes slower, blood supply to muscles increases, tissue growth and repair occurs, energy is restored and hormones are released (such as growth hormone which is essential for growth and development). 
In my previous post about sleep, I mentioned the following:

Sleep loss may increase the risk of obesity because the chemicals and hormones that control appetite and weight gain are released during sleep.

The release of these hormones occurs in stage 4.
REM:
After NREM we experience the first REM period (usually begins about 70-90 minutes after we fall asleep). We are not conscious during this but the brain is still very active. The REM period is when most dreams occur and our eyes dart around (rapid eye movement). Breathing rate and blood pressure rise and our bodies are effectively paralysed. The paralysation of our bodies could be nature’s way of preventing us from acting out our dreams.
After REM sleep, the whole 90-110 cycle begins again and we start with stage 1 of NREM sleep! Unless, of course, are disturbed by annoying relatives or cats.
More on sleep:
http://sleepfoundation.org/how-sleep-works/what-sdhappens-when-you-sleep
 http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/humanbody/sleep/articles/whatissleep.shtml

cosmosscience:

Amazing artwork from whisperfall.

What happens when we sleep?

Imagine you get a healthy 8-9 hours of sleep without waking up constantly in the night (hah, I wish). What would happen in these 8-9 hours?

When we sleep we go through a reoccuring cycle that repeats itself approx every 90-110 minutes. During this cycle we experience NREM (non-rapid eye movement) and REM (rapid eye movement)  sleep. NREM is split into four stages and occurs 75% of the night, whilst REM only occurs 25% of the night.

NREM:

NREM occurs when we begin to fall asleep. We enter stage 1 when we are between falling asleep and being awake. Stage 1 is considered “light sleep”. Our muscle activity slows down and twitching is normal. It is very easy to wake someone who is in stage 1 of NREM. 

We enter stage 2 of NREM after around 10 minutes of light sleep (stage 1). Stage 2 lasts around 20 minutes and accounts for the largest part of human sleep. Breathing and heart rate start to slow down, body temperature drops and we become disengaged from surroundings. 

After 20 minutes of stage 2, we enter stage 3. The brain begins to produce delta waves, which is a type of wave that has a high amplitude and low frequency. Breathing and heart rate are at their lowest levels during this stage.

Stage 3 and 4 are known as deep sleep. If we are awakened during deep sleep we will often feel disorientated and some of us grumpy/annoyed. It is normal for children to experience bed-wetting, night terrors or sleepwalking during stage 4. A lot happens during stage 3 and 4; muscles are relaxed, blood pressure drops, breathing becomes slower, blood supply to muscles increases, tissue growth and repair occurs, energy is restored and hormones are released (such as growth hormone which is essential for growth and development). 

In my previous post about sleep, I mentioned the following:

Sleep loss may increase the risk of obesity because the chemicals and hormones that control appetite and weight gain are released during sleep.

The release of these hormones occurs in stage 4.

REM:

After NREM we experience the first REM period (usually begins about 70-90 minutes after we fall asleep). We are not conscious during this but the brain is still very active. The REM period is when most dreams occur and our eyes dart around (rapid eye movement). Breathing rate and blood pressure rise and our bodies are effectively paralysed. The paralysation of our bodies could be nature’s way of preventing us from acting out our dreams.

After REM sleep, the whole 90-110 cycle begins again and we start with stage 1 of NREM sleep! Unless, of course, are disturbed by annoying relatives or cats.

More on sleep:

http://sleepfoundation.org/how-sleep-works/what-sdhappens-when-you-sleep

 http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/humanbody/sleep/articles/whatissleep.shtml

Source

A paleontology field school in the Bighorn Basin found an incredibly well-preserved fossil of an ancient anteater-like mammal this summer. The fossil is a Palaeanodon, a ground-dwelling insect eater the size of a cat that lived about 53-million years ago. Colorado State University Field School Instructor Kim Nichols discovered the skeleton and says the fossil is a very rare find because so much of the animal’s skeleton was found. Such small creatures are hardly ever discovered intact.  Its excellent condition is also unusual, Nichols says.
“Why was this one preserved so well? I have no idea. It was just good fortune. I have to tell you, this was the find of my life. I was just thrilled. As I said, the students, this was their second day in the field so they weren’t as excited as I was.”
Nichols says it was only the second day of the dig when she found it.
“And I looked up the slope and I saw what I thought was the modern bones of an animal. And I went up a little closer and when I picked them up and took a closer look, I realized immediately that they were fossils. But as I kept looking around the slope, I kept finding more and more of the same individual.”
Nichols says as much as half the skeleton has been recovered including part of the skull, all the legs and many fingers and toes. 
Nichols says the area where it was found near Greybull was once a rainforest and now produces an amazing numbers of interesting fossils, including ancient horses, tapirs and extinct carnivores.
She says the skeleton will need two years of labor to remove all the sediment before it can be turned over to the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, where she hopes to see it eventually displayed.


Find you about how you can join our Paleontology Field School here. 

Source

A paleontology field school in the Bighorn Basin found an incredibly well-preserved fossil of an ancient anteater-like mammal this summer. The fossil is a Palaeanodon, a ground-dwelling insect eater the size of a cat that lived about 53-million years ago. Colorado State University Field School Instructor Kim Nichols discovered the skeleton and says the fossil is a very rare find because so much of the animal’s skeleton was found. Such small creatures are hardly ever discovered intact.  Its excellent condition is also unusual, Nichols says.

“Why was this one preserved so well? I have no idea. It was just good fortune. I have to tell you, this was the find of my life. I was just thrilled. As I said, the students, this was their second day in the field so they weren’t as excited as I was.”

Nichols says it was only the second day of the dig when she found it.

“And I looked up the slope and I saw what I thought was the modern bones of an animal. And I went up a little closer and when I picked them up and took a closer look, I realized immediately that they were fossils. But as I kept looking around the slope, I kept finding more and more of the same individual.”

Nichols says as much as half the skeleton has been recovered including part of the skull, all the legs and many fingers and toes. 

Nichols says the area where it was found near Greybull was once a rainforest and now produces an amazing numbers of interesting fossils, including ancient horses, tapirs and extinct carnivores.

She says the skeleton will need two years of labor to remove all the sediment before it can be turned over to the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, where she hopes to see it eventually displayed.

Find you about how you can join our Paleontology Field School here