Think Venus Figures are more than just a “prehistoric pinup”? Make sure you come to our big Anthropology Connections talk this Friday (10/17) at 6PM in Behavorial Sciences Room 101. All are welcome to attend.
Let us know you’re coming to “Pornography Is in the Eye of the Beholder” here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1537098156519589/
Artwork by CSU student, Stephanie Ozimek

Think Venus Figures are more than just a “prehistoric pinup”? Make sure you come to our big Anthropology Connections talk this Friday (10/17) at 6PM in Behavorial Sciences Room 101. All are welcome to attend.

Let us know you’re coming to “Pornography Is in the Eye of the Beholder” here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1537098156519589/

Artwork by CSU student, Stephanie Ozimek

scientiflix

scientiflix:

What is the Evidence for Evolution?

Biologists teach that all living things on Earth are related. Is there any solid evidence to back this claim? Join us as we explore the facts! We start with a close look at the origin of whales from land mammals, and then touch on the origins of several other critters, including our own species.

If you want to learn more about whale fossils and evolution, we have articles for you to enjoy on our website! http://statedclearly.com/articles/category/evolution

Uploaded by: Stated Clearly.

anthrocentric

thejunglenook:

markscherz:

hyacynthus:

markscherz asking Jane Goodall her advice for women in the sciences. Tune in for her answer!

What an inspiration of a woman. A true hero.

I adore markscherz so much for asking this question.

trentanthrosociety
nativeamericannews:

Flint Tools of the Paleo Indians
The Paleo-Indians of North America, or the First Peoples, lived between 14,000 and 10,000 years before the present. Their use of flint tools to hunt, kill and butcher animals as big as mastodons is legendary. Flint is a glass-like quartz stone that splinters easily, which makes exceptionally sharp edges for tools. The tools of the Paleo-Indians have distinct designs developed at three different periods: Clovis, Folsom and Plano.

nativeamericannews:

Flint Tools of the Paleo Indians

The Paleo-Indians of North America, or the First Peoples, lived between 14,000 and 10,000 years before the present. Their use of flint tools to hunt, kill and butcher animals as big as mastodons is legendary. Flint is a glass-like quartz stone that splinters easily, which makes exceptionally sharp edges for tools. The tools of the Paleo-Indians have distinct designs developed at three different periods: Clovis, Folsom and Plano.


Eighty years ago, a Smithsonian archaeologist visited northern Colorado to investigate evidence of an ancient bison-hunting culture. What he found here forever changed our understanding of the first peoples of North America. In honor of this profound discovery, the City of Fort Collins Natural Areas Department and the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery is hosting a symposium entitled Lindenmeier: Ancient Lives, Ancient Dreams.
Experts on the area, including Dr. Jason LaBelle, and a number of CSU alumni, will be speaking at this not-to-be-missed symposium. (October 19-22, 2014)
Register now.

Eighty years ago, a Smithsonian archaeologist visited northern Colorado to investigate evidence of an ancient bison-hunting culture. What he found here forever changed our understanding of the first peoples of North America. In honor of this profound discovery, the City of Fort Collins Natural Areas Department and the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery is hosting a symposium entitled Lindenmeier: Ancient Lives, Ancient Dreams.

Experts on the area, including Dr. Jason LaBelle, and a number of CSU alumni, will be speaking at this not-to-be-missed symposium. (October 19-22, 2014)

Register now.

anthrogirlet
theolduvaigorge:

How does the research on primates benefit humans?

There are few topics as controversial as research involving experiments on animals in general and primates in particular.

from Max Planck Institute 
“The conflict centres on two irreconcilable ethical obligations: the obligation to seek ways of making diseases treatable and in this way reduce human suffering, on the one hand, and the obligation to protect the lives of animals, on the other. As long as animal testing remains the only way of accessing knowledge about the functions and complex biological interactions in living organisms, there can be no satisfactory solution to this conflict.
A few figures to begin: As all experiments on animals are subject to both authorisation and approval, there are very accurate statistical records available on them. According to the statistics, the number of animals killed for the requirements of basic research in Germany is only 0.03 percent of the total number of animals sacrificed for human requirements (this only includes the animals killed to provide food and materials and does not include the extermination of so-called vermin etc.). Around three-quarters of all laboratory animals are rodents; the percentage of non-human primates (e.g. macaques, marmosets and vervet monkeys) is 0.05 and has remained constant for years.
Playing around with numbers like this is of little help when it comes to the ethical balancing of animal and human suffering. It is true that animals are killed to gain information. But it is not true that animals are tortured. It is clearly important to examine the harm and suffering inflicted on animals in basic research. However, the hope and assumption is that the knowledge gained from the experiments will serve in establishing a better understanding of the cause of diseases in animals and humans, and the development of effective treatments. The desire to forego the knowledge that can be gained from animal testing means deliberately foregoing the desire to help people who suffer from diseases for which no treatment currently exists. This is the moral dilemma” (read more).
(Source: Max Planck Institute)

theolduvaigorge:

How does the research on primates benefit humans?

There are few topics as controversial as research involving experiments on animals in general and primates in particular.

  • from Max Planck Institute 

The conflict centres on two irreconcilable ethical obligations: the obligation to seek ways of making diseases treatable and in this way reduce human suffering, on the one hand, and the obligation to protect the lives of animals, on the other. As long as animal testing remains the only way of accessing knowledge about the functions and complex biological interactions in living organisms, there can be no satisfactory solution to this conflict.

A few figures to begin: As all experiments on animals are subject to both authorisation and approval, there are very accurate statistical records available on them. According to the statistics, the number of animals killed for the requirements of basic research in Germany is only 0.03 percent of the total number of animals sacrificed for human requirements (this only includes the animals killed to provide food and materials and does not include the extermination of so-called vermin etc.). Around three-quarters of all laboratory animals are rodents; the percentage of non-human primates (e.g. macaques, marmosets and vervet monkeys) is 0.05 and has remained constant for years.

Playing around with numbers like this is of little help when it comes to the ethical balancing of animal and human suffering. It is true that animals are killed to gain information. But it is not true that animals are tortured. It is clearly important to examine the harm and suffering inflicted on animals in basic research. However, the hope and assumption is that the knowledge gained from the experiments will serve in establishing a better understanding of the cause of diseases in animals and humans, and the development of effective treatments. The desire to forego the knowledge that can be gained from animal testing means deliberately foregoing the desire to help people who suffer from diseases for which no treatment currently exists. This is the moral dilemma” (read more).

(Source: Max Planck Institute)

veganprimatologist

biomorphosis:

Aye-aye is one of the strangest looking primates. They can only be found in the north-eastern parts of Madagascar. They are nocturnal and usually at the altitude above 700 meters of rain forest trees.

It has specifically designed middle finger which is used for extraction of food from trunks, braches and hard shells. Aye-aye taps a branch with its finger and listens if there is any sound of moving insects or larvae inside. If the movement is detected, aye-aye will make a hole with sharp teeth and use its middle digit to scoop the prey.

The ancient legends of Malagasy considered it the symbol of death due to its scary looks and eerie call. They believe that if the long pointed finger is pointed to any person, death befalls him/her. This leads people to kill aye-ayes on sight. Aye-aye is listed as nearly threatened species with 1000 left on the wild  and it is currently under protection.

anthrogirlet

theolduvaigorge:

Digging Through the World’s Oldest Graveyard

In Ethiopia, paleontologists are pushing back the clock on humanity’s origins.