archaeologicalnews

Crumbling tower in ancient Mongolian ruins offers clues about Khitan history

archaeologicalnews:

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Japanese researchers who made the first comprehensive study in six decades of a crumbling brick tower from an 11th-century fortress town in eastern Mongolia say their findings shed light on the little-known nomadic Khitan people.

The tower is the centerpiece of ruins in Kherlen Bars, a settlement that dates to the Liao Dynasty (916-1125), when the Khitan flourished. The site is about 600 kilometers east of Ulan Bator, Mongolia’s capital.

A team of researchers from Nara University made a number of discoveries about the structure of the tower. They also found remnants of a mural that suggests the Khitan were more advanced than historians realized. Read more.

oleanderbreeze
oleanderbreeze:

poopsapiens:

csuanthro:

Source

While other players in massively multiplayer online games may be questing, pwning or leveling up, students and staff of the CSU Department of Anthropology are conducting field work.
From World of Warcraft to, more recently, Guild Wars 2,Colorado State cultural anthropology Professor Jeff Snodgrasshas gathered research in online communities alongside students in his class, Cultures of Virtual Worlds: Research Methods.
For Snodgrass’s current class, buying a copy of Guild Wars 2, which Snodgrass made available through the CSU bookstore, is a requirement. From then on, students practice field work in the virtual world, interacting with real people, conducting interviews and collecting field notes.
“It’s that multiplayer dimension that piques the interest of an anthropologist,” Snodgrass said.
According to Snodgrass, the stereotype of a gamer as a young man unemployed and living in a basement is false. He says there are a variety of different people who play MMOs, differing in age and with different education and income levels. However, Snodgrass said around 70 percent of MMO players are males in their late twenties with a high or average income level.
Recently, Snodgrass, alongside researchers from UCLA, the University Alabama and the University of Utah, published their findingsin a paper entitled, “A vacation from your mind: Problematic online gaming is a stress response.” They concluded that, although there may be negatives associated with excessive use, MMOs such as World of Warcraft can serve as stress relievers.
“In this sense, online video gaming is not so different from other hobbies or passions initially pursued for pleasure but which can turn compulsive, be it long-distance running, chess and bridge, or sports fandom,” stated the study.
According to the study, MMOs can act as a true form of escape that may reach problematic levels for those who live in stressful situations. The study compiled interviews from various players detailing their personal experiences. Some players dealt with different offline stresses that resulted in excessive amounts of playing.

Read More…

I could write a damned tome on this, just from my personal experiences in WoW for eight years.  Yes, eight years.  It would be a bit surreal to go back into that environment as a field worker.

My anthro department! Woo!

Woo!

oleanderbreeze:

poopsapiens:

csuanthro:

Source

While other players in massively multiplayer online games may be questing, pwning or leveling up, students and staff of the CSU Department of Anthropology are conducting field work.

From World of Warcraft to, more recently, Guild Wars 2,Colorado State cultural anthropology Professor Jeff Snodgrasshas gathered research in online communities alongside students in his class, Cultures of Virtual Worlds: Research Methods.

For Snodgrass’s current class, buying a copy of Guild Wars 2, which Snodgrass made available through the CSU bookstore, is a requirement. From then on, students practice field work in the virtual world, interacting with real people, conducting interviews and collecting field notes.

“It’s that multiplayer dimension that piques the interest of an anthropologist,” Snodgrass said.

According to Snodgrass, the stereotype of a gamer as a young man unemployed and living in a basement is false. He says there are a variety of different people who play MMOs, differing in age and with different education and income levels. However, Snodgrass said around 70 percent of MMO players are males in their late twenties with a high or average income level.

Recently, Snodgrass, alongside researchers from UCLA, the University Alabama and the University of Utah, published their findingsin a paper entitled, “A vacation from your mind: Problematic online gaming is a stress response.” They concluded that, although there may be negatives associated with excessive use, MMOs such as World of Warcraft can serve as stress relievers.

In this sense, online video gaming is not so different from other hobbies or passions initially pursued for pleasure but which can turn compulsive, be it long-distance running, chess and bridge, or sports fandom,” stated the study.

According to the study, MMOs can act as a true form of escape that may reach problematic levels for those who live in stressful situations. The study compiled interviews from various players detailing their personal experiences. Some players dealt with different offline stresses that resulted in excessive amounts of playing.

Read More…

I could write a damned tome on this, just from my personal experiences in WoW for eight years.  Yes, eight years.  It would be a bit surreal to go back into that environment as a field worker.

My anthro department! Woo!

Woo!

Dr. Nowell will be coming to CSU to speak on October 17th, 2014. Find out more here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1537098156519589/

archaeologicalnews

King Richard III’s Final Moments Were Quick & Brutal

archaeologicalnews:

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Richard III’s last moments were likely quick but terrifying, according to a new study of the death wounds of the last king of England to die in battle.

The last king of the Plantagenet dynasty faced his death at the Battle of Bosworth Field on Aug. 22, 1485, only two years after ascending the throne. The battle was the deciding clash in the long-running Wars of the Roses, and ended with the establishment of Henry Tudor as the new English monarch.

But Richard III’s last moments were the stuff of legend alone, as the king’s body was lost until September 2012, when archaeologists excavated it from under a parking lot in Leicester, England. Now, a very delayed postmortem examination reveals that of nearly a dozen wounds on Richard’s body, only two were likely candidates for the fatal blow. Read more.

anthropologyadventures
neuromorphogenesis:

Human brain reacts to emoticons as real faces
Humans have developed to read :-) in the same way as a human face, but do not have the same connection with (-:

Emoticons such as :-) have become so important to how we communicate online that they are changing the way that our brains work.


They are used to provide clues to the tone of SMS, emails and tweets that can be hard to succinctly describe in words alone. But Dr Owen Churches, from the school of psychology at Flinders University in Adelaide, has found that they have become so important that we now react to them in the same way as we would to a real human face.


When we see a face there is a very specific reaction in certain parts of the brain such as the occipitotemporal cortex. When that image of a face is inverted there is another very specific reaction. This can be tracked using advanced brain scanning techniques.


Churches found that the same reaction occurred when 20 participants in a study were shown emoticons, but only when they were viewed in the traditional, left-to-right format. When they were “inverted”, or flipped to be read right-to-left, the expected reaction was not found.


This showed that humans have now developed to read :-) in the same way as a human face, but do not have the same connection with (-:. The study, published in the Social Neuroscience journal, also included participants being shown real faces and meaningless strings of characters as controls.

neuromorphogenesis:

Human brain reacts to emoticons as real faces

Humans have developed to read :-) in the same way as a human face, but do not have the same connection with (-:

Emoticons such as :-) have become so important to how we communicate online that they are changing the way that our brains work.

They are used to provide clues to the tone of SMS, emails and tweets that can be hard to succinctly describe in words alone. But Dr Owen Churches, from the school of psychology at Flinders University in Adelaide, has found that they have become so important that we now react to them in the same way as we would to a real human face.

When we see a face there is a very specific reaction in certain parts of the brain such as the occipitotemporal cortex. When that image of a face is inverted there is another very specific reaction. This can be tracked using advanced brain scanning techniques.

Churches found that the same reaction occurred when 20 participants in a study were shown emoticons, but only when they were viewed in the traditional, left-to-right format. When they were “inverted”, or flipped to be read right-to-left, the expected reaction was not found.

This showed that humans have now developed to read :-) in the same way as a human face, but do not have the same connection with (-:. The study, published in the Social Neuroscience journal, also included participants being shown real faces and meaningless strings of characters as controls.