Here’s just a taste of what you can look forward to with our Archaeology Field School photos! 
This is the crew at Niwot Ridge,where they recorded historic and prehistoric sites. The oldest site dated back to the late Paleoindian period, over 9,000 years ago!
Find out more about the field school here: http://anthropology.colostate.edu/archaeology-field-school/
Interested? Our Field School Information Session will be September 23rd, 2014 (5:00PM) in Clark C249. Mark your calendars!
[Pictured: Noah Bendict, dominique Kovalaski, Christina Burch, Lance Shockley, Cassidy Crawford, Hallie Meeker, Brady Nelson, and Michelle Dinkel]

Here’s just a taste of what you can look forward to with our Archaeology Field School photos! 

This is the crew at Niwot Ridge,where they recorded historic and prehistoric sites. The oldest site dated back to the late Paleoindian period, over 9,000 years ago!

Find out more about the field school here: http://anthropology.colostate.edu/archaeology-field-school/

Interested? Our Field School Information Session will be September 23rd, 2014 (5:00PM) in Clark C249. Mark your calendars!

[Pictured: Noah Bendict, dominique Kovalaski, Christina Burch, Lance Shockley, Cassidy Crawford, Hallie Meeker, Brady Nelson, and Michelle Dinkel]

wildcat2030
wildcat2030:

Taller, Fatter, Older: How Humans Have Changed in 100 Years - Humans are getting taller; they’re also fatter than ever and live longer than at any time in history. And all of these changes have occurred in the past 100 years, scientists say. So is evolution via natural selection at play here? Not in the sense of actual genetic changes, as one century is not enough time for such changes to occur, according to researchers. Most of the transformations that occur within such a short time period “are simply the developmental responses of organisms to changed conditions,” such as differences in nutrition, food distribution, health care and hygiene practices, said Stephen Stearns, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at Yale University. [10 Things That Make Humans Special] But the origin of these changes may be much deeper and more complex than that, said Stearns, pointing to a study finding that British soldiers have shot up in height in the past century. “Evolution has shaped the developmental program that can respond flexibly to changes in the environment,” Stearns said. “So when you look at that change the British army recruits went through over about a 100-year period, that was shaped by the evolutionary past.” And though it may seem that natural selection does not affect humans the way it did thousands of years ago, such evolutionary mechanisms still play a role in shaping humans as a species, Stearns said. “A big take-home point of all current studies of human evolution is that culture, particularly in the form of medicine, but also in the form of urbanization and technological support, clean air and clean water, is changing selection pressures on humans,” Stearns told Live Science. “When you look at what happens when the Taliban denies the polio vaccination in Pakistan, that is actually exerting a selection pressure that is different in Pakistan than we have in New York City,” he said. Here’s a look at some of the major changes to humans that have occurred in the past century or so. (via Taller, Fatter, Older: How Humans Have Changed in 100 Years)

wildcat2030:

Taller, Fatter, Older: How Humans Have Changed in 100 Years
-
Humans are getting taller; they’re also fatter than ever and live longer than at any time in history. And all of these changes have occurred in the past 100 years, scientists say. So is evolution via natural selection at play here? Not in the sense of actual genetic changes, as one century is not enough time for such changes to occur, according to researchers. Most of the transformations that occur within such a short time period “are simply the developmental responses of organisms to changed conditions,” such as differences in nutrition, food distribution, health care and hygiene practices, said Stephen Stearns, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at Yale University. [10 Things That Make Humans Special] But the origin of these changes may be much deeper and more complex than that, said Stearns, pointing to a study finding that British soldiers have shot up in height in the past century. “Evolution has shaped the developmental program that can respond flexibly to changes in the environment,” Stearns said. “So when you look at that change the British army recruits went through over about a 100-year period, that was shaped by the evolutionary past.” And though it may seem that natural selection does not affect humans the way it did thousands of years ago, such evolutionary mechanisms still play a role in shaping humans as a species, Stearns said. “A big take-home point of all current studies of human evolution is that culture, particularly in the form of medicine, but also in the form of urbanization and technological support, clean air and clean water, is changing selection pressures on humans,” Stearns told Live Science. “When you look at what happens when the Taliban denies the polio vaccination in Pakistan, that is actually exerting a selection pressure that is different in Pakistan than we have in New York City,” he said. Here’s a look at some of the major changes to humans that have occurred in the past century or so. (via Taller, Fatter, Older: How Humans Have Changed in 100 Years)

wildcat2030
wildcat2030:

read of the day: Won’t they help?
Why bystanders are reluctant to report a violent crime or aid a victim, and how they can be taught to step up and help - Bethesda in the state of Maryland is the kind of safe, upscale Washington DC suburb that well-educated, high-earning professionals retreat to when it’s time to raise a family. Some 80 per cent of the city’s adult residents have college degrees. Bethesda’s posh Bradley Manor-Longwood neighbourhood was recently ranked the second richest in the country. And yet, on 11 March 2011, a young woman was brutally murdered by a fellow employee at a local Lululemon store (where yoga pants retail for about $100 each). Two employees of the Apple store next door heard the murder as it occurred, debated, and ultimately decided not to call the police. If the attack had occurred in poor, crowded, crime-ridden Rio de Janeiro, the outcome might have been different: in one series of experiments, researchers found bystanders in the Brazilian city to be extraordinarily helpful, stepping in to offer a hand to a blind person and aiding a stranger who dropped a pen nearly 100 per cent of the time. This apparent paradox reflects a nuanced understanding of ‘bystander apathy’, the term coined by the US psychologists John Darley and Bibb Latané in the 1960s to describe the puzzling, and often horrifying, inaction of witnesses to intervene in violent crimes or other tragedies.
go read..
(via How we can get bystanders to help victims of crime – Dwyer Gunn – Aeon)

wildcat2030:

read of the day: Won’t they help?

Why bystanders are reluctant to report a violent crime or aid a victim, and how they can be taught to step up and help
-
Bethesda in the state of Maryland is the kind of safe, upscale Washington DC suburb that well-educated, high-earning professionals retreat to when it’s time to raise a family. Some 80 per cent of the city’s adult residents have college degrees. Bethesda’s posh Bradley Manor-Longwood neighbourhood was recently ranked the second richest in the country. And yet, on 11 March 2011, a young woman was brutally murdered by a fellow employee at a local Lululemon store (where yoga pants retail for about $100 each). Two employees of the Apple store next door heard the murder as it occurred, debated, and ultimately decided not to call the police. If the attack had occurred in poor, crowded, crime-ridden Rio de Janeiro, the outcome might have been different: in one series of experiments, researchers found bystanders in the Brazilian city to be extraordinarily helpful, stepping in to offer a hand to a blind person and aiding a stranger who dropped a pen nearly 100 per cent of the time. This apparent paradox reflects a nuanced understanding of ‘bystander apathy’, the term coined by the US psychologists John Darley and Bibb Latané in the 1960s to describe the puzzling, and often horrifying, inaction of witnesses to intervene in violent crimes or other tragedies.

go read..

(via How we can get bystanders to help victims of crime – Dwyer Gunn – Aeon)

archaeologicalnews

Archaeologists discover Roman ‘free choice’ cemetery in the 2,700-year-old ancient port of Rome

archaeologicalnews:

image

ROME (AFP).- Archaeologists in Italy have uncovered a cemetery in the 2,700-year-old ancient port of Rome where they believe the variety of tombs found reflects the bustling town’s multi-cultural nature.

Ostia “was a town that was always very open, very dynamic,” said Paola Germoni, the director of the sprawling site — Italy’s third most visited after the Colosseum and Pompeii.”What is original is that there are different types of funeral rites: burials and cremations,” she said this week.

The contrasts are all the more startling as the tombs found are all from a single family — “in the Roman sense, in other words very extended”, Germoni said. Read more.

From Huffington Post

In the heart of Kenya’s vast northern rangelands, for example, Samburu families banded together in 2004 to create the West Gate Community Conservancy to protect wildlife and redirect tourism profits to local livestock herding families. It’s working. Local families have partnered with a tourist company with which they share tourist profits. Gone are the days of the profits of Kenya’s wildlife tourism flowing largely to the rich in Africa, Europe, Asia or North America. Among the additional benefits the conservancy is providing are communal funds for education, health care, jobs and training.

And the conservancy is managing to protect the wildlife that is generating this local economic good. Poachers kill fewer elephants inside the conservancy than in nearby unprotected savanna. Even elephants mortally injured elsewhere by poachers, says the manager of Kalama, a nearby conservancy, will retreat to the safety of these conservancies to die.

What’s brand new is that the local communities here in Kenya’s conflict-prone north are beginning to see their conservancies deliver something even more fundamental to them: better security, fewer conflicts and more secure land rights. ‘Communities that have been caught in a seemingly endless cycle of retaliatory cattle raiding and that formed conservancies are breaking this cycle by returning stolen livestock to their owners’, explained Jeff Worden, a senior scientist with the Northern Rangeland Trust(NRT). This organization supports 26 conservancies across Kenya’s ‘wild north’ with planning, security measures, and monitoring.

[…]

Source

Dr. Galvin’s research is in the Huffington Post today!